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Who wouldn't like a new Lamborghini Miura heading

Who wouldn't like a new Lamborghini Miura

Who wouldn't like a new Lamborghini Miura

By Mark Smeyers on March 3. 2021 in LamboNEWS.

The Lamborghini Miura was built between 1966 and 1972, in total only 763 ever left the factory doors in Sant'Agata, on the final Miura SV, the Spinto Veloce edition, only 150 were made before the legendary Lamborghini Countach took over the V12 reign at Lamborghini.

Over 50 years later, the Lamborghini Miura is still breaking records, it seems that with each passing auction where a Miura passes the block, the price goes up, previously an SV with dry-sump lubrication and a limited-slip differential sold for over $4,000,000, while a more standard Miura SV just sold for nearly $3,000,000 last month.

So it's obvious the Lamborghini is a classic these days, and while the Countach prices are rising toward the 7-figure prices too, the Miura is still the record-setting production model from Lamborghini, and I believe many would love the idea of buying a modern-day Lamborghini Miura, with somewhat classic styling, but with all the contemporary amenities and safety requirements we need on the road today.

The 2006 Lamborghini Miura Concept created by the factory, but never went in production

About 15 years ago, even Lamborghini had this idea when they created their own 'Miura Concept' and unveiled it on the Lamborghini stand at the 2006 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, sadly it remained a one-off concept and resides in the official factory museum as a static model.

There were rumors Lamborghini would build this Miura Concept, albeit in very limited numbers, for high-value customers, they even mentioned a $1,000,000 price tag ... but that never materialized, and as far as I know the museum car is the only one ever built.

But that hasn't kept numerous 3D artist around the world from creating their interpretation of how a Lamborghini Miura would look today, some modify the design of the original car, something that will never happen as these days even very nice Miura SVJ conversions from the Seventies get restored to original Miura SV specifications.

But a few 3D designers take the Miura for inspiration and do a kind of retro-styled, modern-day interpretation, and while not all tend to come out looking as interesting as the real, classic Miura, some do look like they could attract some serious customers in the end.

I'm sure if Lamborghini would create a new Miura, buyers would be lining up

And one that certainly falls into this last category is the Miura Carbonio seen in this article, created by Anderson Tomazoni, who can be found on Behance.net, and calls himself a 'Self Taught 3D Artist', living in Brazil.

He has taken the original Lamborghini Miura design and considerably made it more modern, with wider wheel arches that hold massive, cross-spoke, bronze finished wheels with Pirelli P-Zero tires, at the front we find a deep chin spoiler running the entire width of the Miura Carbonio, with vertical stabilization fins on either side of the large air intake in the Cofango.

The Huracan STO might use the Cofango today, but it was the Miura that came with this amazing, tilting front section, first. There is still an air vent on the front bonnet for the radiator mounted behind the intake, while those typical air intakes behind the side windows are a 'must-have' trademark look on any Miura recreation.

The side sills on the Miura Carbonio also come with those vertical fins, naturally finished in clear carbon fiber, as is the rear diffuser, which also houses a massive pair of exhausts smack in the middle, and a Y-shaped taillight LED that looks like it was borrowed from the Lamborghini Veneno.

I guess on the Miura Carbonio these dials will be LCD screens ...

In one of the renders, we can get a peek of the interior, and it seems Tomazoni liked the two round dials in the classic Miura, so he fitted those again in his recreation, these would probably be LCD screens today, and while the design shows a rather thin steering wheel, I would fit a thicker rimmed one and ditch those small rearview mirrors on the outside for cameras, but that's just me.

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